Comida en Oaxaca

January 23rd, 2011 § Comments Off on Comida en Oaxaca § permalink

A brief snapshot of the food we’ve eaten in Oaxaca…

Huevos Divorciados | Cafe de Olla, 65 pesos ($5.40)

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Huevos Rancheros | Cafe de Olla, 65 pesos ($5.40)

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Nido de Grillos, Rancho Zapata Restaurante | 90 pesos ($7.50)
Grasshoppers with chips and guacamole

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Tamal Oaxaqueña, Rancho Zapata Restaurante | 60 pesos ($5.00)

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Comida Corrida: Albondigas | 40 pesos ($3.30)
Comida Corrida is a set meal of 3 or more dishes. This one included pasta soup, rice, and agua de jamaica.

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Mole Coloradito | El Escapulario, 60 pesos ($5.00)

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Tlayuda con Cecina | El Escapulario, 40 pesos ($3.30)

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Pozole Roja con Pollo | 65 pesos ($5.40)

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Traditional Chocolate Water at the Etla Market

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Enchilada at the Etla Market

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Enfrijolata at the Etla Market

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A brief snapshot of the food we’ve eaten in Oaxaca…

…Make that five things to eat and drink in Oaxaca

January 18th, 2011 § Comments Off on …Make that five things to eat and drink in Oaxaca § permalink

Tlayuda


Oaxacan chefs are proud of their food. They cook from their heart, you can feel the love in the food. They are especially proud of their local fare. Asking for a recommendation at any restaurant will result in advice to order from the Especial Típico Oaxaqueño menu. Usually full of moles and things made with chapulines (grasshoppers), Tlayuda was also on the menu at El Escapulario ((If you’re going to Oaxaca, definitely eat here! The address is Garciá Vigil #617 Altos., near the Santo Domingo cathedral)).

Similar to a tostada, and called by some “Mexican pizza,” Tlayudas are made by coating a giant baked tortilla with refried beans, lard, vegetables, Oaxacan cheese, and a main topping (or more). At El Escapulario, I ordered the Tlayuda con Cecina — thin strips of pork with a chili powder crust. It was excellent, and for 40 pesos (a little over $3.00 U.S.) quite filling!

Four things to eat and drink in Oaxaca

January 17th, 2011 § 1 comment § permalink

Mole is sold as a paste at the Benito Juarez Market

1. Mole
Mole is a complex sauce that takes days to make with a long list of ingredients. There are seven varieties and I’ve tried 5 so far: negro (black), colorado (red), amarillo (yellow), verde (green), almendrado (almond).

Cocoa beans for sale at the Tlacolula Sunday Market

2. Hot chocolate
Cocoa beans are imported from elsewhere in Mexico, but are an important item here in Oaxaca. Chocolate is mainly used in the mole and as a hot beverage made with water or milk (and flavored with other spices like cinnamon or vanilla). I will soon be taking a walk down the “chocolate factory street” called Mina to find the best hot chocolate…

3. Grasshoppers
I still need to buy a handful of fried hoppers from the market to eat like peanuts…those I have tried thus far have been incorporated into sauces.

4. Mezcal
It’s smoky liquor from the agave plant…similar to tequila, but a totally unique flavor. I’ve had it in a drink with grapefruit soda, from the shot glass, and have tasted several of the cream-style flavors (like coconut, coffee, etc).